Challenge 4 – Using images in posts

 

You Sexy ThangEven though this is a week of freedom, I feel we need a post about using images.

Can you use any image on the internet?

No you can’t.

You can use images that are creative commons where the owner has given you permission to use the image as long as you include attribution. Here is a chart about the different licenses for images. There are many websites and search tools on the web for finding images that are creative commons. Some of these give you the attribution in an easy format as well. The one I have found easiest to use is compfight.

If using images from Wikimedia, here is a post about their licensing and what is acceptable by them. Here is their post about using wikimedia commons outside of wikimedia.

If you are administrator on an Edublogs or campus Edublogs platform blog, check out the plugins in your dashboard. Do you have one there called Compfight? If yes then activate it and look at the settings. These are the settings I use.

Once you have activated and checked your settings, the icon next to the word Compfight will now appear in your post dashboard next to the other insert/upload icons. To add a creative commons image to your blog post is now only one click away. You also have attribution  included.

How to add the image and attribution.

  • 1. Write your complete post.
  • 2. At the end of your post on a new line, click on the compfight icon.
  • 3. Put in your search term and find a small image that you want to use.
  • 4. Click on the S under the image.
  • 5. Now the image you chose and the attribution is at the bottom of your post.

Moving and aligning your image

You will notice most images I use are in the top right corner of my post with writing to the left of that image. How do I do that?

  • 1. Click on the image and drag it so the cursor is at the beginning of the first line on my post.
  • 2. Click on the image and click on the first icon you see. This will take you to an area where you can align the image to the right.
  • 3. Click on the advanced settings tab of this page and put 10 in both the vertical and horizontal boxes. This will now give me a space around the image so my writing doesn’t run right into the image.
  • 4. Now update.

For those who don’t have the compfight plugin

You can still find images easily at the Compfight website.

  • 1. Put in your search term.
  • 2. Once the images are shown, on the left sidebar make sure these words are in black – tags only, creative commons, show originals, safe and pop up on
  • 3. Choose an image below the dotted line – these are free and creative commons now
  • 4. Save the small version of the image to your computer – change the filename to something relating to the image instead of the numbers
  • 5. Copy the code in the box
  • 6. Back to your blog post which you have already written - at the bottom on a new line paste in the code using Ctrl V – change the tab from visual to HTML before pasting the code – then change back to visual to add your image.
  • 7. Click at the beginning of the line where you want your image to appear.
  • 8. Use the insert image icon at the top of your post, to find and download the image you have now saved on your computer drive.
  • 9. Once the image has been crunched and downloaded, you can align the image to the right.
  • 10. Click on the advanced settings tab of this page and put 10 in both the vertical and horizontal boxes. This will now give you a space around the image so your writing doesn’t run right into the image. Now update.

If using a blogging platform other than Edublogs, check out the help sites linked below.

Blogger or blogspot or kidblog

Other websites or tools for images, clip art etc

You will need to work out how to get the attribution to put on your posts.

Morguefile – a great post explaining how to use including attribution

Open ClipArt

Flickrcc – Here is a post I have written about using flickrcc

Pics4learning – A post I have written about using this website.

Activities relating to images

  • If you have used images in previous posts, go back and give attribution for the images. If they are not creative commons, GNU or fair play, then you will need to take the images out of your posts.
  • Write a post about your passions and find an appropriate image to include. Remember attribution needed.
  • Find a great image and write a post about it.

 Activity relating to the number 10

Put together an animoto, slideshow, poster or collage on a theme using 10 images you have found eg Animals at the zoo. Remember to add attribution as an image at the end of the animoto or slideshow. Include attribution with each image on your collage or poster.

Do you have any other great sites for finding images, clipart, music, sounds etc?

Please leave a comment on this post so other readers can share your knowledge.


Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Nick Wheeler via Compfight

Challenge 4 – Lots of choice

Some excellent posts being written, but I am only finding out about them by accident. Many students are still not adding a trackback or link on their post that leads back to the blogging challenge post they are writing about.

 

 

 

Improving your blog

Instead of me writing about copyright and creative commons, finding images and including attribution, I am giving you a link to a post written by Sue Waters from Edublogs as part of the teacher challenge blog. Before including any images in your posts, please read this very carefully. It is a very long post, but worth reading especially for students with their own blogs and for teachers to use when teaching about images in blogs and creative commons.

Recently I have also written a couple of posts about using pics4learning, flickrcc and google advanced search to find images. These are not as detailed as the post by Sue Waters.

Here is a link to the post I wrote in the March set of challenges. It includes two movies you might wish to use about creative commons and copyright and suggestions for posts relating to using images.

Again this week, you have freedom of choice 

  • post about a topic of your own choice
  • your passions, your favourites
  • start a series of posts
  • write your own story and have your visitors help guide the next part of the story
  • an activity mentioned in a previous challenge that you didn’t have time to complete.

But if you are stuck for ideas

Check out these history, geography and languages activities I found on the web. You might like to write a post about which sites you visited.

Play these online games: Remember don’t click on any ads as they often have spyware and viruses

Still more time to spare

  • Keep visiting other classes and students. Read their posts, answer their questions, leave comments – make connections.
  • Write a post about your visits to other blogs. Which ones do you recommend others visit and why?
  • Find some widgets relating to history, geography and/or languages that you could add to your blog sidebar. Remember to copy the embed code then go to your dashboard>appearance> widgets and drag a text box widget across. Paste in the code and save. If using other blog platforms, check out the “Get Help”section on this blog.

Image: ‘Postcards

Week 5: Adding images and attribution

What is this? If you didn’t take the photo, then someone else did. Some photographers get paid money for taking images to use in newspapers, so often online newspapers copyright their images. This means you would have to pay money or have the photographer’s permission to use that photo on your blog.

Why? Your blog is in the public domain and is available for anyone to see. You are not allowed to put copyright images on your blog without the permission of the owner.  This means you need to find images that are creative commons instead.

What is that? Watch this YouTube video about sharing your work and creative commons.

Teachers: A fantastic guide to copyright, fair use and creative commons has been written by Ronnie Burt and I would suggest you read this to understand more about using images, music and video on your blogs. Larry Ferlazzo also has a great “Best List for images” that you might want to check out as well.

Below is a list of websites that have creative commons images. Remember attribution doesn’t include a URL beginning with http://images.google.com/   or some other search engine.

Attribution is the URL of the original image.

litter on beachStudents:

1.  Write a post about your Spring break or Easter holiday. Include at least one image that is creative commons. Include the attribution at the bottom of the post. Here is a post to show you how to insert an image.

2.  Do you think you should have a creative commons license for your blog? Why or why not? Is your audience mainly students in your class and/or the blogging challenge or have you had readers that are teachers and/or visitors you don’t know?

3.  Visit ten blogs from students in the challenge  of different ages. How many of these blogs had images with attribution? How many blogs did not have images at all? Which blogs did you prefer to read and why? Leave your answer here as a comment or leave a comment on each of the blogs you visited.

4.  After having visited Sue Waters on adding images and creating a gallery, write two posts about using images in blogs.

  • Why should we use images? How do images improve your blog? This is the first post
  • How do you add images to your blog?
  • Where do you get your images?
  • How do you add the attribution?

Make the second post like a tutorial, so a student new to blogging could follow your instructions about using images in a post.

5. Create a visual post using no more than eight images – where the images tell a story. Remember to give attribution for the images you used. No writing in this post other than the title and attribution.

6. From Bill Ferreirae – I sometimes find a picture and tell students to use that picture to come up with a story. It can be about the picture, what happened before, what will happen next, etc. So, at the top of the student activities  is the image I have chosen for you to start with. Copy the image to your post, then write the story. Remember to give attribution. If you don’t have your own blog, tell your story in a comment here.

7. From EileenG – Pick one, or more of your ethnic backgrounds and post about the culture. ANYTHING! Food, religions, sports, festivals, languages, etc.  Include a picture of the place in the country/region posted about.

8.  Be creative with regard to images – create a collage on a topic or colour etc, use glogster or animoto or prezi. Just remember you must link back to the original image and give attribution for any images used.

Teachers

If using Edublogs, create a gallery of images to represent your class’s holiday or break.  Here is a post on how to create a gallery in your blog. Remember to include the attribution of where you found the images. Perhaps you could also add the ‘Support CC’ button like I have below, on your blog sidebar.

Attribution:

Image by Sue Wyatt

The original comic of this YouTube video remix can be found here: http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Sharing_Creative_Works

A Fair(y) use tale from YouTube

Support CC

Visit these -March 2011 -Week 5

Oh dear, I am colour blind after all the excellent colour posts. I also enjoyed reading the picture sentences and stories. Keep up the great work including the attribution for any images you use.

Early challenges like my blog and avatars

Candice, Carli, Amy, Nicky, Abbi and Katie,

Speaking a different language

French, Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian, Maori,

Polls to vote on

New Zealand,Vancouver Island, Vietnam, New Zealand, Paris, Canada, British Columbia, Canadian Province,

Visit my place

Paraparaumu, Courtenay, Orange City, Kapiti Coast, Courtenay, Jennifer, Mimi, Hannah, Neneng, Hilary,

Colour post

Maya, Tracy, Diwa, Abbey, Khanh, Song Yong Min, Duy, Chermelle, Mark, Betty, Autumn, Shyanne, Darcy, Eric, Candice, Kyle, Mark, Jordyn,

Blogger would love to go to:

Australia and Indonesia, Dominican, Australia, Paris, Grenoble,

Posts recommending great blogs for your blogroll

Eric, Allen,

Let’s ZOOM with:

runners (shoes), Feet in high heels, a flower, an orange, Caleb, Aimee, a cake,

Embedding images

Abbey, Chandler, Jaci, Abbey,

Excellent posts to read

Kyra, Josie, 2yCroydon, unknown person in challenge, Shyanne, Jennifer, MsMartinez’s class, Ms Martinez class, Maya, Duy,

Picture sentences

Adell, Amanda, Zachary, Abbey,

My boating picture

Emma, Sophie, Song, Duy,

Original image: ‘May their JOY Embrace U!(Bali Kuta Beach)

Bali

by: Kenny(zoompict) Teo

Released under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Image search -Challenge 5 -March2011

Checking out many of the posts from last week, I noticed that quite a few students are starting to include images in their posts. Images certainly make posts more interesting to read especially when the image relates to the information in the post.

Can you use any images that are on the internet? The answer is definitely NO!!

But can’t I just go to Google search and use images from there? The answer is definitely NO!!

Not all images on the internet are free for everyone to use. Some newspapers have paid a lot of money for a photographer to take images for their newspaper articles and if you want to use these images, you might have to pay money to either the newspaper or photographer. These photos are usually called COPYRIGHT.

But there are some photographers who take photos that are free for others to re-use or mix or use for public display. These images have a CREATIVE COMMONS license. Check out this website for information about Creative Commons. Each country has slightly different licenses.

If you get images from Flickr, then here are what the different licenses mean (Thanks Sue Waters from Edublogs for this image)

Notice, whatever license you use, you HAVE to attribute the original author. This means you have to acknowledge the person who created the original image. At the end your blog post, or linked within the post,  you must attribute the image and you must link the photo back to it’s original photo page.

Well, how can I safely find images to use in my posts?

Students and classes

So here are nine (9) activities relating to images. You must do activity 1 as this will help for the other choices.

Activity 1 – Visit these blogs

  • Kathleen Morris who expects her Grade 2 students to know about and use creative commons and giving attribution when using images in their blogs. She uses FlickrCC which is not blocked at her school and gives instructions for using with Edublogs blogs. Check out her slideshow in the box.
  • Ronnie Burt from the Edublogs team who gives ideas for using images other than FlickrCC.
  • Miss Wyatt has also written a post giving lots of other places to find images.
  • Sue Waters from The Edublogger who also gives out some easy instructions on inserting images. Notice at the end of her post, she has six more posts you could read about using images in your blogs.
  • Allanah King, New Zealand. Lots of hints for students using blogspot.

Activity 2 – Using tags to find images and adding them to posts

Teachers: You might be interested in checking out these:  resources using flickr, telling stories with images, photo books, photo slideshow, copyright friendly links, photovisi is a collage, paint the world a picture blog post.

Students: Last week we looked at using tags in our blogs, now we are going to use tags to find images.  Below are some great websites to use that have images with creative commons licenses.

Wylio – will need to join for free – (attribution included in the embed code)

Comp fight – See below (attribution)

Flickrcc – edit in house (attribution)

Morguefile, Pics4Learning, using Google search with creative commons,

This next section of the post has been written by Sue Waters from Edublogs as part of the teacher challenge held earlier this year. She has also mentioned about the attribution and where to find it in the site.

1.  Go to Compfight

2.  Change to Creative Commons only, choose whether to search tags or text, add your search term and click Search.

Change your Compfight settings

3.  Scan through the search results and click on the Photo you like so that you can view it on its photo page on Flickr.

Flickr photo page

4.  Scroll down right hand side of photo page to view License.

5.  Hold your Ctrl key and left mouse click on “Some Rights Reserved” to open up the license on a new browser tab to read terms of its license on Creative Commons.

  • Only use if license is applicable for your situation.

Checking the license

6.  Now select View All Sizes from the drop down Action list and select the size of the photo you want to use.

View all Flickr Photo sizes

7.  Right click on Image and select Copy Image Location or Copy Image URL (depends on what web browser you are using).

Copy Image URL

8.  Now go to the post you are writing inside your dashboard and click on Add an Image icon

9   In the Add an Image window click on the From URL tab
10.  Add the image URL, image title, select the image alignment, add the URL of its Flickr photo page to the Link Image URL field and then click Insert Into Post

  • In this example the URL of its Flickr photo page is http://www.flickr.com/photos/53611153@N00/309709280/
  • You link to its Flickr photo page as it is a requirement of Flickr’s conditions of use and so that if any one clicks on the photo they can view the original source of the image.

Adding an image from Flickr to a post

11.  Add the photo attribution either below the photo or at the end of your blog post.

  • It’s a requirement of all Creative Commons Licenses that you attribute the original author.
  • This means you can’t just use a creative commons image without acknowledging the person who originally created it.
  • The text below this photo is are examples of how you can attribute an image — look closely at what websites the attributions links to!

Example 1:

Photo by Darwin Bell licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

Example 2:

Original image: ‘swinger_girl_01b‘
http://www.flickr.com/photos/82546262@N00/205492421
Released under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Original image: ‘a piggy in the middle

a piggy in the middle

Released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License

Please note:

  • Some School Districts block Flickr
  • In these types of  situations you’ll need to download the photo onto your computer and then upload it to your blog post. Even if you have downloaded to your computer, you will still need to give correct attribution.

Activity 3 – Colour a post

Write a post about your favourite colour and include at least three images. Remember to resize them to small or no bigger than about 400 pixels in width. Remember to explain why you chose those particular images and include the attribution correctly.

Activity 4 – Create your own images and add to a post of your choice

Other options for creating your own images include:

  1. Image Generators such as ImageGenerator.org
  2. Comic Generators like MakeBeliefsComix.com,  kerpoof, ToonDoo
  3. Photo Editors like Befunky, fd’s Flickr Tools
  4. Tag Cloud Creators such as Wordle
  5. Graph Creators including GraphJam and Crappy Graphs

Mixing up your images using these types of tools can really spice up your posts!

Activity 5 – Zoom out from an image

We tried this activity in the last challenge in September. Choose a picture, and have your readers zoom out, so to speak, by leaving comments. So maybe something simple, like a pillow, and the first commenter describes something bigger around the pillow (like a couch) and the next commenter would write about the room it was in, and the next could zoom out the window and do the house, etc.  If doing this activity, include the word ‘zoom’ in your title so I can find it easily. Remember to give attribution. Most important here is to read previous comments, so you can add to the story.

Check out these zoom pictures: Becky, Jacqueline, Abbey, Teegan,

Huzzah finished their story.

Activity 6 – Pictures tell the story – no words

Here is a post on how to create a gallery in your blog.  Create a visual post using no more than eight images – where the images tell a story. Remember to give attribution for the images you used. No writing in this post other than the title and attribution.

Activity 7 – Tell the story of the picture

From Bill Ferreirae – I sometime find a picture and tell students to use that picture to come up with a story. It can be about the picture, what happened before, what will happen next, etc. So, at the top of this post is the image I have chosen for you to start with. Copy the image to your post, then write the story. Remember to give attribution. If you don’t have your own blog, tell your story in a comment here.

Activity 8 – Create an animated photo show

Think of a theme, try adding images to animoto, slide or other online image animators. Add music, transitions, text etc. Grab the resultant code and add to your blog post.

Activity 9 – Write a sentence using images – no writing

Write a sentence about yourself using just images. For example – I love to read comic books. Remember to give attribution for each image and in the title use the word ‘sentence’ to make it easier for me to find.

We will be playing a game in a couple of weeks. To take part in the game you need the following completed:

  • a blog avatar and a user avatar
  • an ‘about me’ PAGE not post
  • a clustrmap or flag counter widget
  • at least three interesting posts – could be topics of your choice not necessarily from the challenge
  • your ‘Recent Comments’ widget on the sidebar with 10 comments as the choice
  • your ‘Recent Posts’ widget on the sidebar with 10 posts as the choice
  • Your ‘Pages’ widget on the sidebar
  • at least 10 student and/or classes linked on your blogroll
  • at least three overseas blogs on your blogroll

Remember to link back to this post so I know you have written a post using images.

Original image: ‘Fun at sea

Fun at sea

by: Ville Miettinen

Released under an Attribution-NonCommercial License

Challenge 5 – Sept 2010

Week 5 so now we are half way through the challenges for this part of the year. Most students have completed the following:

  • added an avatar – both blog and user
  • created an ‘About me’  page – also a post for some students
  • written some interesting posts on their state or town
  • commented on classmates and other student or class blogs
  • added useful widgets like clustrmap, flag counter, cyber pet

This week we want you to start adding images to your posts. If students in grade 2 can learn how to give attribution for images they have used, then so can every student and adult taking part in this challenge.

So here are our activities relating to images. You must do activity 1 as this will help for the other choices.

1. Visit these blogs

  • Kathleen McGeady who expects her Grade 2 students to know about and use creative commons and giving attribution when using images in their blogs. She uses FlickrCC which is not blocked at her school and gives instructions for using with Edublogs blogs. This is a great example of a tutorial type post which we would like you to complete in activity 5.
  • Ronnie Burt from the Edublogs team who gives ideas for using images other than FlickrCC.
  • Miss Wyatt has also written a post giving lots of other places to find images.
  • Sue Waters from The Edublogger who also gives out some easy instructions on inserting images. Notice at the end of her post, she has six more posts you could read about using images in your blogs.
  • Allanah King, New Zealand. Lots of hints for students using blogspot.

2. After having visited the above blogs, write two posts about using images in blogs.

  • Why should we use images? How do images improve your blog? This is the first post
  • How do you add images to your blog?
  • Where do you get your images?
  • How do you add the attribution?

Make the second post like a tutorial, so a student new to blogging could follow your instructions about using images in a post. Thanks to Mrs Theriault.

3.  Visit this wallwisher to add where you have found great creative commons images.

4. Watch these YouTube videos about creative commons and sharing your work

5. Here is a post on how to create a gallery in your blog.  Create a visual post using no more than eight images – where the images tell a story. Remember to give attribution for the images you used. No writing in this post other than the title and attribution.

6. From Bill Ferreirae – I sometime find a picture and tell students to use that picture to come up with a story. It can be about the picture, what happened before, what will happen next, etc. So, at the top of this post is the image I have chosen for you to start with. Copy the image to your post, then write the story. Remember to give attribution. If you don’t have your own blog, tell your story in a comment here.

7. A great suggestion from Dragon – We could do a “zoom” post through comments. Choose a picture, and have your readers zoom out, so to speak, by leaving comments. So maybe something simple, like a pillow, and the first commenter describes something bigger around the pillow (like a couch) and the next commenter would write about the room it was in, and the next could zoom out the window and do the house, etc.  If doing this activity, include the word ‘zoom’ in your title so I can find it easily. Remember to give attribution. Most important here is to read previous comments, so you can add to the story.

8. From EileenG Pick one, or more of your ethnic backgrounds and post about the culture. ANYTHING! Food, religions, sports, festivals, languages, etc.  Include a picture of the place in the country/region posted about.

As we still have some students and classes only on week 2 or 3 activities, I will be postponing the game till next week. To take part in the game you need the following completed:

  • a blog avatar and a user avatar
  • an ‘about me’ PAGE not post
  • a clustrmap or flag counter widget
  • at least three interesting posts – could be topics of your choice not necessarily from the challenge
  • your ‘Recent Comments’ widget on the sidebar with 10 comments as the choice
  • your ‘Recent Posts’ widget on the sidebar with 10 posts as the choice
  • Your ‘Pages’ widget on the sidebar

Original image: ‘take a chance on me ??

take a chance on me ??

by: Andi

Released under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

March 2010: Challenge 5

Creative commons, images and attribution

What is this? If you didn’t take the photo, then someone else did. Some photographers get paid money for taking images to use in newspapers, so often online newspapers copyright their images. This means you would have to pay money or have the photographer’s permission to use that photo on your blog.

Why? Your blog is in the public domain and is available for anyone to see. You are not allowed to put copyright images on your blog without the permission of the owner.  This means you need to find images that are creative commons instead.

What is that? Watch this YouTube video about sharing your work and creative commons.

Below is a list of websites that have creative commons images. Remember attribution doesn’t include a URL beginning with http://images.google.com/   or some other search engine. Attribution is the URL of the original image.

http://flickrcc.bluemountains.net/

http://johnjohnston.name/flickrCC/

http://compfight.com/

http://www.behold.cc/

http://www.pics4learning.com/

http://www.morguefile.com/

http://www.freefoto.com/index.jsp

http://www.imageafter.com/index.php

http://www.djusd.k12.ca.us/technology/images.htm

Finally a link from Mr Bogush’s class for their links to photos to use

Beginner

Write a post about your Spring break or Easter holiday. Include at least one image that is creative commons. Include the attribution at the bottom of the post. Here is a post to show you how to insert an image.

Veteran

Do you think you should have a creative commons license for your blog? Why or why not? Is your audience mainly students in your class and/or the blogging challenge or have you had readers that are teachers and/or visitors you don’t know?

Commenter

Visit ten blogs from students in the challenge  of different ages. How many of these blogs had images with attribution? How many blogs did not have images at all?Which blogs did you prefer to read and why? Leave your answer here as a comment or leave a comment on each of the blogs you visited.

Class

If using Edublogs, create a gallery of images to represent your class’s holiday or break.  Here is a post on how to create a gallery in your blog. Remember to include the attribution of where you found the images. Perhaps you could also add the ‘Support CC’ button like I have below, on your blog sidebar.

Attribution:

The original comic of this YouTube video remix can be found here: http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Sharing_Creative_Works

Support CC