Week 5: Culture and family

How are you going getting comments from people other than your classmates?

Have you received comments from overseas visitors?

Has anyone in your family left a comment? Remember you might need to teach them how to leave a comment.

Activity 1: Write a post about your family – include their interests, where you might have been together as a family. Remember to include grandparents, cousins, aunts and uncles.

Activity 2: Encourage family members to leave comments on your posts over the next few weeks. Check out Mrs Yollis and her class who celebrate family blogging month in November.

Activity 3: How can you increase the number of comments on your blog? Write a post about ways to get more comments on your blog. Be creative and think outside the square – can you find at least ten ways to get more visitors and comments? You might want to make a poster for this activity.

Activity 4: Have a family member write a post for you to add to your blog. They could write it and email or post it to you. Does this post attract more visitors or family members leaving comments? One family member regularly blogs on Mrs Yollis’ blog – Where is nonno?

Activity 5: Interview a family member and write a post about them – include the interview recording. You could use audioboom online or from your phone then upload the file to your blog. Make sure you ask permission first before putting it on your blog.

Activity 6: As a family, are there any cultural activities you do together? This might relate to food, celebrations, festivals. Write a post about at least one of them.

Activity 7. Add a widget to find out where your commenters are coming from.

There are many different widgets you can use – clustrmaps, flag counter, feedjit or revolver map.  Have you seen any others while visiting blogs of other students? Maybe you could write a post about why you chose the commenter widget you have put on your blog.

Activity 8. Add one or more widgets about your area of the world

This might include a clock or weather or a translator widget in case students who don’t speak your language can translate your post.

When adding widgets to your sidebar, copy and paste the embed code into a text box on your sidebar. Save then close.
If the widget is too wide, you will have to adjust the number next to ‘width’ in the embed code.
This might appear more than once in the code.
If using blogger rather than Edublogs, you might need to check out the instructions for adding widgets and images etc from Bling For Your Blog, written by a teacher in New Zealand. Thanks Allanah.

If your blog is an Edublogs free blog, you might not be able to put all the widgets in your sidebar. If using Kidblog or Weebly you might not be able to add widgets so put them in a post instead or a widgets page on your blog.

Activity 9 Visit other participants and ask questions

Visit at least five other blogs from students or classes around the world and ask some questions in your comments. How many countries are represented in the challenge participants? Have you been to a blog from each of these countries?

Activity 10 Questions in a post

Write a post including at least 6 questions about the different countries mentioned in activity 9.

Image: ‘Connecting Communities

Still got time left:

Check out these posts from previous weeks

Global issues: Emily, Lauren, Angel, Claudia, Isabella, Logan, Mohamed, Iqra,

Series of posts on one topic: Shahreen on HIV/Aids,

Odds and ends: Molly using scratch, Thunyama , Chloe and Ella want you to finish the story, Chloe on idioms,

UPDATE   UPDATE

As next week is Easter here in Australia, there will be no post on the 16th April. The  next post will be Sunday 23rd April.

Maybe you could use this time to visit other blogs, have a go at some activities you haven’t finished or just write some interesting posts.

Have you been checking out the class blogs as well? Many of these have student blogs attached on the sidebar.

Week 6: Our food and culture

An important part of blogging as part of a global community is learning more about each others’ culture.  Food is often one of the first things you notice when visiting another country. (If you completed this activity last year, you might want to change the topic to stories, songs or clothing from your culture)

This week we’re going to learn more about each others’ culture by sharing stories about food popular in our country or asking other participants questions about food in their country.

To help you get started I’m going to tell you about food that is popular in Australia.

Vegemite

VegemiteVegemite is uniquely Australian and most Aussies have a jar of Vegemite in their house.  We even have our own Vegemite song! It’s a dark brown food paste made from leftover brewers’ yeast, vegetables and additives.

Our favorite way of eating Vegemite is on toasted bread with a layer of margarine (or butter) spread with a thin layer of Vegemite.

While some might say Vegemite is an acquired taste — the true secret to eating Vegemite is the thin layer of Vegemite on toast.  Most of the hilarious taste testing Vegemite videos on YouTube are caused by trying to eat Vegemite like you would Peanut butter, Nutella or Jam.

Aussie Meat Pies

The Meat pie is considered iconic in Australia and New Zealand.  These are hand-sized meat pies made up of diced or minced meat and vegetables.

Most Australian bakeries sell a wide variety of meat pies, sausage rolls in addition to bread and cakes.  Meat pies and sausage rolls are a common lunch food here and you can also buy them at most lunch bars and petrol stations.

Pies

Selection of pies and sausage rolls at a bakery

Home made meat piesEach bakery has their own unique recipes.

You might enjoy making meat pies with your students.  It isn’t hard.

Here are some tips:

  • Follow this Curtis Stone Meat Pie recipe.
  • Make the filling in advance and wait until it is completely cooled until you use it to fill the pies (I don’t add the chicken livers).
  • You eat the pie by holding it in your hand.

Food in other Countries

A challenge with visiting other countries is sometimes the food you are used to isn’t available or is hard to get.

Watch Brian Lockwood video where he discusses the challenges of buying bread in China.  Brian is an American teacher who works at a school in Nanjing, China.

Activity 1: 

Write a post on food, songs, stories or clothing that is popular in your country.

In your post, include links to where you researched and some images with attribution. You might also want to a collage of images or a slideshow you have created.

Activity 2:  

Visit Inside Scoops Taco Tuesday post to learn what their students eat for lunch.  Leave a comment on Taco Tuesday post to let them know what you eat for school lunches in where you live or write a post to share what school lunches are like where you live.

Activity 3:  

Create a poll or survey and embed it into a post to find out more about the types of foods eaten by your readers or songs sung, stories told or clothing worn.

Activity 4:

Visit at least 5 blogs from countries other than your own. Leave a comment on a post at each blog to ask them questions about food, songs, stories or clothing in their country. Now write your own post including the comment you have left and linking to each post you commented on.

 

 

 

 

 

Week 5: Our food

An important part of blogging as part of a global community is learning more about each others’ culture.  Food is often one of the first things you notice when visiting another country.

This week we’re going to learn more about each others’ culture by sharing stories about food popular in our country or asking other participants questions about food in their country.

To help you get started I’m going to tell you about food that is popular in Australia.

Vegemite

VegemiteVegemite is uniquely Australian and most Aussies have a jar of Vegemite in their house.  We even have our own Vegemite song! It’s a dark brown food paste made from leftover brewers’ yeast, vegetables and additives.

Our favorite way of eating Vegemite is on toasted bread with a layer of margarine (or butter) spread with a thin layer of Vegemite.

While some might say Vegemite is an acquired taste — the true secret to eating Vegemite is the thin layer of Vegemite on toast.  Most of the hilarious taste testing Vegemite videos on YouTube are caused by trying to eat Vegemite like you would Peanut butter, Nutella or Jam.

Aussie Meat Pies

The Meat pie is considered iconic in Australia and New Zealand.  These are hand-sized meat pies made up of diced or minced meat and vegetables.

Most Australian bakeries sell a wide variety of meat pies, sausage rolls in addition to bread and cakes.  Meat pies and sausage rolls are a common lunch food here and you can also buy them at most lunch bars and petrol stations.

Pies

Selection of pies and sausage rolls at a bakery

Home made meat piesEach bakery has their own unique recipes.

You might enjoy making meat pies with your students.  It isn’t hard.

Here are some tips:

  • Follow this Curtis Stone Meat Pie recipe.
  • Make the filling in advance and wait until it is completely cooled until you use it to fill the pies (I don’t add the chicken livers).
  • You eat the pie by holding it in your hand.

Food in other Countries

A challenge with visiting other countries is sometimes the food you are used to isn’t available or is hard to get.

Watch Brian Lockwood video where he discusses the challenges of buying bread in China.  Brian is an American teacher who works at a school in Nanjing, China.

Activity 1: 

Write a post on food that is popular in your country.

In your post, include links to where you researched and some images with attribution. You might also want to a collage of images or a slideshow you have created.

Activity 2:  

Visit Inside Scoops Taco Tuesday post to learn what their students eat for lunch.  Leave a comment on Taco Tuesday post to let them know what you eat for school lunches in where you live or write a post to share what school lunches are like where you live.

Activity 3:  

Create a poll or survey and embed it into a post to find out more about the types of foods eaten by your readers.

Activity 4:

Visit at least 5 blogs from countries other than your own. Leave a comment on a post at each blog to ask them questions about food in their country. Now write your own post including the comment you have left and linking to each post you commented on.

 

Check out these posts that couldn’t be flipped:

Add to Allegra’s story, Alice, Rachel’s creative commons video, Kloey, Teagan, Tayah, Chelsea, Tahlia, Ella, Mia’s video about widgets, Milica from Serbia – use the translation widget, Emily, Angel, Camille created a glogster on commenting, Aisho’s tribute to her grandma, Mary Ellen, Alexis on commenting, Gauri, Mary Ellen,

Classes with links to student posts

Huzzah – cat, dog or both with images

Mrs Arendts grade 5 class – have introduced themselves and would love some comments

Room 19 Allstars  have done some great Blog Action Day posts

Mr Helpern’s students used images with attribution

Students writing in comments

Favourite family time,

Here is the link to the flipboard magazine where many of your #RaiseYourVoice posts were flipped.

A range of topics were raised from looking at diseases to girls education and of course bullying online and in real life.

Decorating your blog

Rhea, Ella, Mikaila, Victoria, Caitlyn,

UPDATE IMPORTANT    UPDATE IMPORTANT

Make sure you read the admin post from earlier this week. Important information about being taken off the student or class lists.

 

 

Week 6 – Our World

abuelos
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: 3dom via Compfight

Our world is a very complex one, yet like the song says it is a small world now especially with technology and ease of transportation. This week we are going to look at the world of your grandparents and even further back if you can. Look at how their culture might have affected the world in which you live.

The world of our grandparents

Activity 1. Survey the students in your class or school. Where were their grandparents born? How many are immigrants to the country they now live in?

Activity 2. Are there any foods you eat that come from your grandparents home country? What recipes have been handed down in the family?

Activity 3. Are there any cultural events that directly relate to the old country from which your ancestors came?

Activity 4. How many generations do you go back before you find an ancestor immigrating to your present country? For example on my mother’s side of the tree, I can go back 5 generations to my great great great grandparents who were sent out from England as convicts to Australia.

Activity 5. What is the most important invention created since your grandparents were born? You might need to ask them and others of their generation.

Cultures of the world

Activity 6. Write a post in your native language. We have students from over 20 countries taking part in this challenge, many don’t speak English as their first language.

Activity 7. Visit blogs written by students from other countries.

Activity 8. How different is your world to that of the other students in this challenge? Write a post asking questions for overseas visitors to answer. Think about water, food, transport, technology rather than singers, movies etc. Watch the video to get more ideas for questions.

Activity 9. Check out some of these games and websites about different cultures of the world.

Still got time left this week – visit the classes and students taking part in the challenge. Leave great comments and continue conversations.

Read the post in our Flipboard Magazines. Great posts from this week will be added to the One World, Our World magazine. But remember, you need an image with attribution or links to a blog or website, paragraphing, spellchecker put through your post if you want it included. Also remember to fill in the form below so I know you have written a post.