Week 10 Part B Evaluation and audit

We have now been together for nearly three months. Time now to evaluate – most teachers ask students to do this after studying a topic for a period of time.

This evaluation is in two parts:

  • auditing your own blog
  • evaluating the challenge

This is an audit of your blog since the beginning of March 2014.

  • How many posts did you write?
  • How many were school based, your own interests or set by the challenge?
  • How many comments did you receive from classmates, teachers or overseas students?
  • Which post received the most comments? Why do you think that happened?
  • Which post did you enjoy writing the most and why?
  • Did you change blog themes at all and why?
  • How many widgets do you have? Do you think this is too many or not enough?
  • How many overseas students do you have on your blogroll?

Now ask another student and teacher/parent from your school who might not have read your blog to do an audit.

Sit beside them while they navigate around your blog, record what you observe as they interact with your blog. When finished, ask them the following questions:

  1. What were your first impressions of this blog?
  2. What captured your attention?
  3. What distracted you on the blog?
  4. What suggestions can you give me to improve my blog?

Write a post about your blog audit.

Part 2 Evaluating the challenge.

This is the twelfth challenge and sometimes I feel like the activities are getting stale especially for those students who have taken part in more than one set of challenges. So over the next few weeks I will be adding new pages that you all can contribute to. Every month of the year, there are special events, festivals, birthdays of authors etc. Which ones do you think it would be interesting to write about? Find the page for that month and add your ideas in the comments.

Now for your final activity – please evaluate the challenge by filling in the following form.

 

 

Week 10 Part A Great blogs

Over the last couple of weeks you have been looking at what makes a great post. This week we are expanding that to

What makes a great blog?

Naturally, a great blog will include great posts but what else will there be?

Maybe you will also need to look at

  • the layout of the blog
  • background design
  • sidebars
  • widgets
  • header

A person might write excellent posts, but then have widgets on the left sidebar that overlap on the writing. There might be loud music playing as soon as you open the blog. There might be a noisy pet chirping away in the background while you are trying to read a post. There might be snow falling all over the blog distracting you from the posts. You might not be able to read comments because of the background colours.

This year is the 11th anniversary of the Edublog Awards.

You are being invited to take part in the awards by nominating great student blogs and great class blogs. Here are lists of the blogs from last year for students and classes. In my opinion, being nominated is just as important as winning one of these awards. Not all nominations go forward to the final list.

How to find some great blogs?

  • Check out the flipboard magazine
  • Read lots of other student or class blogs

In order for your nomination to count, you MUST do the following.

  1. Write a post on your blog nominating one blog.
  2. Give reasons for the nomination, why you think it is a great blog.
  3. You cannot nominate your own blog.
  4. In your post, include a link to the blog of the person you are nominating.
  5. When you have published your post come back here to fill in the form below.
  6. Your nomination will not count, unless you fill in the form below.

You may only nominate one blog for each category.

There will be other categories to nominate in later in the year when the actual awards are publicised.

 

Week 9: Doing my best

From Darkness to Light - please read
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Evan Leeson via Compfight

Well, this is our second last week in the March challenge for 2014. Over the last 8 weeks, you have learnt a lot about blogging if you have done most of the activities and checked out the links included in my posts.

It is now your time to do your best and show your teachers and myself what a great blog post looks like.

The one and only activity for this week:

Write a post on one of the following topics

  • What makes a great family
  • A global issue you would like to help solve
  • My future
  • Visiting overseas

Having read many of your posts, I came up with the following essentials in a great post.

  1. catchy title
  2. includes at least one visual whether photo, cartoon, video or another web 2.0 tool like padlet or glogster
  3. interesting topic with the passion of the author coming through
  4. well written and not copy/pasted from somewhere else
  5. shows it has been proofread and spellchecked
  6. written in paragraphs – at least three of them
  7. includes links to other websites on similar topics – at least two of these

When you have finished your post, please come back here to the blogging challenge and leave a comment on this post. Mention which topic you wrote about and leave a link to your post. Those posts covering the seven things mentioned above will be added to the flipboard magazine.

Still more time left this week:

Visit other student and class blogs.

Read posts and leave comments.

Decide on a student blog and/or class blog you would like to nominate for the Edublogs Awards in November/December this year. You will get a chance next week to write a post about the blog you have chosen. HINT: Can’t be your own blog nor one from another student in your class.

Week 8: Schooling

Class photo
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Anna M via Compfight

There are many different types of schools around the world. Most of the students in the challenge go to a government or public school, I think. But some are homeschooled like Warrior Kat and Ghost Soldier. Visit their school blog written by their mother. We have some students go to specific religious schools yet others go to international schools.

How is your school the same or different to a government or public school?

Activity 1.

Answer some of these questions by writing one or more posts or present using a variety of tools mentioned in the sidebar:

  1. What time do you normally get up to go to school?
  2. What do you normally have for breakfast, recess, lunch, tea (dinner, supper)?
  3. How do you get to school?
  4. How long does it take to get to or from school?
  5. A typical lunch at school
  6. Subjects you have to do – remember to explain abbreviations like LOTE and ELA
  7. Specialist subjects or electives, options
  8. Technology in your school
  9. A typical schoolday with timetable and breaks
  10. What do you do at break times? Games, activities etc
  11. School bell has gone for end of day – what happens now?
  12. Do you have to wear uniform?
  13. How many days per year are you at school? How is this arranged – terms etc?
  14. What do you enjoy most about school?
  15. If you could improve your school, what would you do?

Activity 2.

You might like to run some surveys in your school re questions 1,3,4 and 10 above. Collect data and create graphs. If you create a google doc to gather data around the world, make sure your teacher contacts me to publicize this over twitter where other classes can join in adding to your data.

Activity 3.

Check out this video on how some students get to school in their country. Find images of children going to school and put together a photo collage or slideshow showing ten interesting images. Remember to include the attribution for the images on the last slide of your slideshow. Here is the link to a video from UNESCO about children getting to school – also includes some statistics re education funding.

Activity 4.

Compare your classroom to these pictures from around the world in the Guardian newspaper. Write a post about what you see and feel when looking at these images. Would you like to be in any of these classes? Why? Also check out the statistics included in the information below each image.  What does this tell you about these classes?

Activity 5.

How has schooling changed over the last 100 years? Interview parents, grandparents, great grandparents, people from other countries and ask them questions about their schooling. Write a post from your results.

If you have completed at least one of the activities above, you might want to take part in our commenting game.

Before you start, please make sure you have at least 5 other student blogs linked on the sidebar of your blog or in a recent post that your visitors can find easily. Make sure these are blogs from other students around the world, not just those in your class or school.

Game week is all about visiting other blogs.

Student and class blogs – new bloggers and old hands at the blogging – mentors as well as participants.

Remember one of  the main aims of blogging includes commenting and carrying on conversations with the author of posts and their other readers.

A good commenter will have read the post carefully, checked out the links in the post and have read the previous comments before they leave one of their own. Good commenters add to the conversation with a quality comment – remember that video from Mrs Yollis’ class.

Game rules

This is one we have run for many challenges and allows you to connect globally.

Those who have taken part in a challenge before know the game of  ‘Count Out Three’. Here are the instructions:

  • click on a blog on the student list – count one
  • now click on a blog from their blogroll – count two
  • finally click on a blog from that blogroll – count three

Leave a comment on an interesting post at this third blog.

Do this activity at least three times and finally, write your own post saying which blogs you visited and which posts you left a comment on. Why did you choose that post? Remember to include a link back to the post you left a comment on so that student gets a pingback or trackback.

Next week is our penultimate week  for the March challenges.

It will be a chance for you to show what you have learnt about blogging in the last three months. You will be asked to write a post, including an image with attribution, links to at least two other websites where you found your information to use in your post as well as use another web tool.  The topic will be set next week. See you then.

Week 7: Leadership

Desert Leader
Photo Credit: Hamed Saber via Compfight

Very early in the blogging challenge, I asked if anyone had ideas for new challenges. Amber left a comment about world leaders. So thanks to her, this week the challenges are all about being a leader.

Activity 1: Characteristics of a leader

Think about some famous leaders like Nelson Mandela, Queen Elizabeth, Mao Tse Tung and Ghandi. What makes them stand out as leaders of the world? What characteristics are common to all four leaders? Perhaps create a Venn Diagram comparing 2 or 3 of these leaders.

Activity 2: Chances for leadership

As a student, you often have chances to show leadership while at school. What are some of these leadership roles available at your school? Would you try to take on one of these roles? Why or why not?

Activity 3: Outside school

Perhaps you are part of a sport team or in the Guides or Scouts. How can you show leadership outside school and in any clubs you might be a member of?

Activity 4: Famous or Leader

Sometimes younger students might think a famous singer, musician, writer is a good leader. Name five famous people who you think show great leadership skills. Explain why and what those skills are?

Activity 5: In the family

Cesar Millan, the dog whisperer,  has a show about being “Leader of the pack.” Are the skills needed to be a leader of the pack different to being a leader in the rest of family life?

Activity 6: Leadership comic, poem or story

Create a comic, poem or story showing leadership skills being used.

Classes: Extra activities

Have a go at a couple of leadership games mentioned at these links.

NEWS UPDATE    NEWS UPDATE

Next week, we will be playing a commenting game. To take part in this game, all classes and students will need the following:

  •  a user avatar if possible
  • an ‘about me’ PAGE if using Edublogs or a post if using other platforms
  • a clustrmap or flag counter widget
  • at least four interesting posts – could be topics of your choice not necessarily from the challenge
  • your ‘Recent Comments’ widget on the sidebar with 10 comments as the choice – Edublogs
  • your ‘Recent Posts’ widget on the sidebar with 10 posts as the choice – Edublogs
  • Your ‘Pages’ widget on the sidebar or pages in the header – Edublogs
  • at least 10 student and/or classes linked on your blogroll
  • at least three overseas blogs on your blogroll
  • posts tagged or categorized to make it easier to find interesting posts on each blog
  • the more students or classes you have linked on your blog, the more fun the game will be

The most important of these are the links to other student blogs on your sidebar. Try to have a couple of different headings like

  • My Friends
  • Class Blogs
  • Overseas Blogs

Having lots of  links to student blogs from other countries will help spread the game.

Here are the instructions for adding links to your sidebars.

EdublogsBloggerKidblog – not sure if this widget goes on the class page or each student page

Have you written lots of interesting posts for your visitors to read next week?

Use this week to get some written or use some new tools to create some stories to add to your blog posts.

Week 6: My visitors

Visitors to New York are sometimes overwhelmed by it all ...
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Ed Yourdon via Compfight

You have been blogging now for at least five weeks.

Have you been getting many visitors?

Have you been receiving many comments?

If your answer is no, then what are you going to do about it?

How can you attract readers to your blog?

When I first began blogging back on January 18, 2008 I was expecting hundreds of comments on my blog posts. They were interesting and describing my journey in teaching using a Smartboard and technology in my classroom. Then I wrote a post less than a week later asking why nobody is commenting on my blog.

I didn’t realise I would have to spend time working out ways for people to find my blog first and then to leave a comment. By the way, I had 16 people leave comments on that post, mainly due to the fact that Sue Waters from Edublogs had tweeted out about my post.

So what hints did my readers leave me ?

  1. Start using twitter – need to be at least 13 years old – maybe you could have a class twitter account
  2. In your posts, add links especially to other bloggers posts that you have found interesting – shows you are reading other blogs
  3. Write for yourself, and put your heart into it – write posts that have nothing to do with school but are about your passions
  4. Have a really interesting about me profile page so your readers can see what your passions are and comment on them
  5. Write posts that give guidelines or how to’s – how to do something in minecraft especially helpful for newbies, create video about how to add a certain widget
  6. Read and share on other blogs – visit lots of other blogs, leave a quality comment including the URL of your blog – they will often come and visit if your comment is interesting
  7. Treat every post as a conversation – reply to every person who leaves a comment

Activity 1: Write a post explaining what you are going to do to attract readers to your blog

Activity 2: Write a post about one of your passions – maybe a hobby, sport, animal, music etc Remember though to write in your own words and not copy/paste from another website.  If you use information from a website, include a link to it in your post. If you include an image, add the attribution as well.

Activity 3: Visit at least 5 blogs from other students or classes but not from your school. Add to the conversation in the comment area of a post. Maybe check out our Flipboard magazine to find some more blogs to read.

Activity 4: Write an interesting how to post – create an origami, make a screencast, create a movie on an ipad, use a certain web tool

Activity 5: Add at least 5 new bloggers to your blogroll or links on your sidebar. Have to be from other countries not your own. Create a link category for overseas bloggers.

Activity 6: Check through all your comments and reply to your readers. If they have asked you to visit their blog, go there and check out a post or two, leave a comment as well.

Activity 7: Many of you have mentors for the blogging challenge. Make sure you have read their comments and continued the conversation with them. If you have not yet had any comments, leave a comment here on the challenge blog, mention one of your great posts you think I should read and comment on – remember to include URL of your blog.

NEWS BREAK

As many schools have just had Spring break and many are having a holiday over Easter, there will be no set challenges next week.

Instead, keep visiting other blogs. There have been some great story starters and poetry written for week 4 challenge.

Catch up with any challenges you might have missed due to testing and holidays.

Read the flipboard magazine, find out if any of your posts are in there. Visit other posts from there, you think might be interesting.

Read comments left on my challenge posts for each week. Visit some of the bloggers who have left links in their comments. Add to some of the comments left on the challenge posts.

Finally enjoy your break and come back to the challenge all refreshed and ready to add to more conversations.

 

Week 5: Guest bloggers

Every year in November/December Edublogs runs an award program. They ask for nominations for student,class, group, individual blogs and a variety of other things. Once nominations are in, they are looked at and a shortlist is created ready for bloggers around the world to vote on.

The winners for best class blog in 2013 are our guest bloggers for this week’s set of activities. This school runs a journalism course for students in Junior High. They have their own blog where students report on events at the school, interview local people, write about the happenings in their community. This week they have set our challenges.

Once you have visited their blog,  completed your activity and left them a comment, come back here and check out the other things you could do this week.

Off you go, click on this link to go to this week’s challenges.

You still here, go.

Going, going, gone.

Gone
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Auntie P via Compfight

Still got time left this week

Visit lots of other blogs from the student and class list.

  • In particular visit those students who don’t have mentors yet – their name is not in colour.
  • Make sure you visit lots of students not from your school.
  • Leave interesting comments as some students have not yet received any comments.
  • Remember, whenever you leave a comment include the URL of your blog in the comment, otherwise that person wont know where your blog can be found, so they wont be able to visit and leave you a comment.
  • Also make sure your comment is a quality comment not just:  This is a good blog, come and visit mine http://studentchallenge.edublogs.org
  • Your comment should look like some of the great ones that have been left on the challenge blog. Check some of them out.
  • Come back here and in a comment tell me of three blogs you left comments on. Why did you choose those three?

Did you notice we have a new flipboard magazine?

Have any of your posts been included? If no, then you probably haven’t left a comment on the challenge blog once you have finished an activity. Remember I am choosing posts that are well written, paragraphed, great spelling and interesting to read.

Do you use twitter?

If yes, then check out our hashtag for the challenge #14stubc  You will find out when new posts are published and some interesting posts to go and visit.

Week 4: A picture is worth

Yes, this week we deal with using images, music and sounds in your posts.

But can’t I use any image, music or sound that is on the internet?

No, you must use creative commons or in some cases the fair use rule.

But where can I find these images, music and sounds?

Head to the creative commons website. Check out the CC wiki to find out what is happening in your country. What are the different licenses used? Teachers check out the education section of creative commons. Youtube allows creative commons for videos. Teachers: A fantastic guide to copyright, fair use and creative commons has been written by Ronnie Burt and I would suggest you read this to understand more about using images, music and video on your blogs. Larry Ferlazzo also has a great “Best List for images” that you might want to check out as well. Mrs Yollis did an activity with her students about creative commons.

OK I want to use some legal creative commons images and music in my slideshow. Where can I go to get them?

Do you have compfight plugin for your blogging platform? Click on this link from previous challenge to find out how to activate it in Edublogs and how to use the normal compfight website.

Other places to get images and music:

You will need to work out how to get the attribution to put on your posts.

Images

Music and sound effects

Jamendo, CCMixter, post with 14 websites for music, post with 20+ websites for music, post with 55+ sites with sound effects

Now for the activities for this week

Activity 1 Watch this video about sharing work and write a post about what you learned.

 Activity 2. Check out this story using remix and fair use of video. Leave a comment below after watching the video. What was interesting, positive or negative about it?

 Activity 3. Find an image or piece of music. Add it to your post and write a poem relating to the image or music. Invite your readers to write their own poems. PS April is Poetry Month. Thanks to Mrs Hutchison for this idea.

Activity 4. Similar to activity 3. Find an interesting landscape image.  Write the beginning of a story relating to your image. Remember to include a conflict of some sort between your characters. Invite your readers to finish the story. How many different endings can you get? Which ending do you prefer?

Activity 5. Write a sentence using just images – no words.

Activity 6. Find 5 images that create a story – again no words.

Activity 7. Create a slideshow, photo gallery or poster about your interests to add to your about me page or as a separate post.

Activity 8 – Create your own images and add to a post of your choice

Other options for creating your own images include:

  1. Image Generators such as ImageGenerator.org
  2. Comic Generators like MakeBeliefsComix.com,  kerpoofToonDoo
  3. Photo Editors like Befunkyfd’s Flickr Tools
  4. Tag Cloud Creators such as Wordle
  5. Graph Creators including GraphJam and Crappy Graphs

Mixing up your images using these types of tools can really spice up your posts! Leave a comment on this post, if you or your class can recommend some other image sites to add to this list.

 Activity 9– Zoom out from an image

We first tried this activity in the challenge in September 2010. Choose a picture, and have your readers zoom out, so to speak, by leaving comments.  Check out the example from Huzzah who finished their story. If doing this activity, include the word ‘zoom’ in your title so I can find it easily. Remember to give attribution. Most important here is to read previous comments, so you can add to the story.

Check out these zoom pictures: BeckyJacquelineAbbey

Activity 10 – Go back to previous posts

If you have used images in any previous posts you have written, then you are ethically obliged to go back to the post and give the correct attribution or take the image out of the post if it does not have the right creative commons license.

Activity 11 – Create a jigsaw from your image. Check out how Mrs Schmidt’s students did this for a previous activity. Here is a post from Mrs Schmidt with a tutorial on how to create the jigsaw images.

Hot air in the cold air and early  morning glowActivity 12– Tell the story of the picture

From Bill Ferreirae – I sometime find a picture and tell students to use that picture to come up with a story. It can be about the picture, what happened before, what will happen next, etc. So, here is the image I have chosen for you to start with. Copy the image to your post, then write the story. Remember to give attribution. If you don’t have your own blog, tell your story in a comment here.

Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Let Ideas Compete via Compfight

Still got time left this week:

Visit other student and class blogs

Start using tags and categories with each post you write to make it easier for people to find posts on certain topics. Make sure you have the tags and categories widgets in your sidebar.

Have at least five other student blogs linked on your sidebar – students from other classes and schools- not your own. We will need this for a game we play in a couple of weeks.

Try to have a few different headings like

  • My Friends
  • Class Blogs
  • Overseas Blogs

Having lots of  links to student blogs from other countries will help spread the game.

Here are the instructions for adding links to your sidebars.

EdublogsBloggerKidblog – not sure if this widget goes on the class page or each student page

 Most important thing to take away from this week’s challenge is:

Use creative commons images, not just any image on the net. Always include attribution of where you found the image. Compfight plugin does this for you.

Week 3: Leaving footprints

I have spent a lot of time this week trying to find different resources to use when talking about leaving our digital footprint.

These first two videos I use each set of challenges as it shows how easily a footprint can be created. It is not only you but your relatives, friends, newspapers etc also add to your footprint.

Then I thought with so many students now involved in social media such as facebook, instagram, pinterest and twitter, how much information are they leaving by not checking their privacy settings but leaving things on default?

Watch this video to see how easy it is to find out information about you. Jenny Luca, director of ICT and eLearning at a college in Australia used this with her grade 7-12 students. Read her post to find out their reactions. Jenny then directed me to another tweet from Doug Peterson in Canada linking to this post from lifehacker.

 

You also leave a footprint when you sign up to join websites such as Moshi Monsters, Voki, Animoto and photopeach.  Do you ever check the terms of service or privacy settings? Have you joined a site that says you must be over 13 years old yet you are only 10?

Being connected with all this technology means everyone is leaving a digital footprint.

Activity 1. Watch the first two videos above then leave a comment on this post about something that you found very interesting in one of the videos. Write a post explaining the differences between the videos. Which did you prefer and why?

Activity 2. After watching the two videos, write a post about your digital footprint. Is it positive or negative? Would you be proud to have your grandparents or your future grandchildren look at everything you have included in your digital footprint? Why or why not? Maybe Google your name to see what is online about you, that you might not have put there. Remember to Google your nickname used in online games etc as information might be included there.

Activity 3. Imagine you are debating this topic: It is better to have a negative digital footprint than no footprint at all. Give three reasons to support each side of the debate.

Activity 4. Watch the third video. Why is it important to check out the settings whenever you buy a new device? Default settings often allow the manufacturer to gain information about you without you realising it.

Activity 5. Should all teachers,principals and parents have a digital footprint in this time of technology? Google your teacher or principal (with their permission first) or even your parents. What have they got online? Do they have some information you think should not be there? Discuss it with them. Write a post about the discussion you had without giving away personal information to your readers.

 Over Easter I am going to be adding to our list of web tools to use in the challenge (see list on sidebar) I am going to be sorting them according to how old you have to be to use them, whether they are free or you have to sign up, whether there is an education version or not and whether that is free or paid and finally what is the tool/app used for.

Activity 6. I would like your help to get the list organized. Write a post about 5 of your favourite web tools or apps. In your post mention how old you need to be to use it, whether you had to sign up to use it and what type of tool or app it is eg mindmapping, poll/survey, slideshow. Also tell me why you enjoy using the tool or app.

Activity 7. Here are some websites to visit related to cybersafety and digital footprints. Visit some of them and write a post, create a poster or glogster, create a cartoon about what you found out. Your teacher might also give you other websites to visit.

  • ACMA Australia – cybersafety for young kidskids and teens.
  • Google has some digcitizenship adventures relating to digital footprints - more for middle and high school students
  • Kidsmart from the UK has some great tips and information

Activity 8. Mainly middle and high school students – There are 9 elements to being a good digital citizen. Read this post then write your own post about what you consider are the most important parts of the nine elements. Are there certain areas you need to improve on? Why?

Activity 9. There are both advantages and disadvantages to being able to connect and communicate more easily. Write a post or run a debate on this topic. Maybe create a comic strip showing each side.

Security

Teachers

Here are some links to  sites relating to digital footprints and internet safety

Still time left

Check your widgets. Do you have one called Class blogs? If yes, then add it to your sidebar. Use the drop down arrow and make sure the number is 30 or so to cover all the students in your class.

Visit other student and class blogs, read our new flip magazines, add links to your blogroll of blogs you visit often. Try to categorize these eg class blogs, overseas students, my friends etc. If unsure how to do this use the Get Help section on the sidebar of this blog.

Remember, next Saturday is Earth Hour. Have you registered to join yet?

 

Week 2: It’s a small world

Welcome to the second set of activities. But first a little bit of

ADMIN

Firstly, with over 1000 students now registered, I am sorting out mentors to be allocated to students. I don’t want one student to end up with  more than one mentor but this will happen if you are on the student list more than once. So PLEASE check the student list and leave a comment on this post if you are on there more than once. I will need your name, URL, country and age to make it easier for me to find you on the list.

Secondly, we still have some classes and students who have privacy settings not allowing others to read posts and/or comment. To check if this is you, go to your blog but DON’T login. Now  try reading and commenting. Are you allowed to? If not, then neither will your visitors. Please change the privacy settings. Any students or classes who still don’t allow comments by Easter will be deleted from the lists.

Thirdly, instead of filling in a Google form each week of the challenge, please come back to the post and leave a comment including the URL of your blog post.  In April I will be starting a new flipboard magazine and will be adding the great posts from both students and classes to that.

Now let’s get to the challenge.

Only 220 years ago, it used to take a sailing ship about 4 or 5 months to sail from England to Australia with convicts on board.  It took me 24 hours, including time zone changes, to fly from Australia to Vancouver, Canada with a short stop in Hawaii for a couple of hours. Yet it took only seconds for my class to connect  in 2008  when we used Skype to make a call.

Students born in the last twenty years  should be taking it for granted that they will be working collaboratively with students and teachers across the world using modern technology.

So this week’s challenge is to tell the world about the area you live in – your town, your state or province, your country in general. But hopefully you will also be having international visitors coming to your blog, so you need some way of knowing where they are coming from. There will be many options of what to do this week ranging from adding widgets, creating avatars, writing posts, leaving comments by visiting international blogs.

Activity 1 Adding widgets

When adding widgets to your sidebar, go to your dashboard>appearance>widgets> drag text box to sidebar area. Now copy and paste the embed code into your text box.

  • Save then close.
  • If the widget is too wide, you will have to adjust the number next to ‘width’ in the embed code.
  • This might appear more than once in the code.

If using blogger rather than Edublogs, you might need to check out the instructions for adding widgets and images etc from Bling For Your Blog, written by a teacher in New Zealand. Thanks Allanah.

Activity 2. So that you are known globally, you need to have an avatar that represents you.

But can’t I use a picture from Google?

No, most pictures on Google or other search engines are copyright and belong to someone else.

Here is a post with links to lots of different avatar sites for you to create an image that looks like you and here is a post for Edublogs or wordpress explaining how to upload your avatar. Blogpost or blogger students check here to upload, Kidblog check here,

Activity 3. Being such a small world now, many classes take part in global events such as Earth Hour (coming up very soon, so register this week), Safer Internet Day (back in February), Global Read Aloud Day (ideas for books needed), Pi Day (just passed) and Clean Up Day (just passed in Australia). Write a post or posts about special global events you or your class have taken part in. What did you learn from the event? Why should it be global?

Activity 3If I were to visit your state or province, what would be the ‘must see’ places and why?

Activity 4. Create a quiz about your state, country; this website is good for embedding a quiz. Try my quiz about Tasmania

Thanks to Celia for reminding me that this site is only for those over 13 years old.

Activity 5. Finally, just for fun, if you have completed one of the other activities perhaps you could try this activity.

When “daddysitting” my father who is just out of hospital, I asked him to give me an activity relating to the topic for this week. He said what about a story about the journey of a small animal like an ant. Remember be creative, use a different webtool and embed into your blogpost.

Still got time left this week:

  • Visit other student and class blogs and read the about pages. Leave quality comments.
  • Check out these maths challenges from Ms Hutchison’s class.

Remember, come back to this post and leave a comment when you have written your post or embedded your quiz. Include the URL of the actual post not just your blog in general.

Attribution: Image: ‘It’s a Small World!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035555243@N01/16600310